How concerned should I be?

Hints, tips, and discussion in regard to the training of "mini-peakes"

How concerned should I be?

Postby LilianRose » Sun Mar 05, 2017 1:43 am

4 weeks ago my then 5 1/2 month intact male Chessie displayed resource guarding with a 5 1/2 month puppy during a puppy playdate. First over a toy, then later over the water dish. Hours later he showed aggression towards my 7yr old child while being hugged. A week following growled at the same 7yr old while I was preparing his food. (2hrs later then he normally eats) Then a week ago was growling at a stranger while out in public, and could not be redirected.
I have spent countless hours on training, socialization, and preventing resource guarding with people. He weekly has encounters with other dogs, (3 playdates and a trip to the dog park in the last 4wks) and has always played very well with no sign of resource guarding. I contacted my breeder after the first issue, and they were shocked about the aggression towads my 7yr old. We have not spoken since. He will often bark/growl at strangers while in public, but is quickly quieted and under control. I expected a protective temperament, but felt worried last week when he was so persistent.
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Re: How concerned should I be?

Postby thomas wilkins » Mon Mar 06, 2017 12:35 am

Lilian,

First of all this is not acceptable. You have to take control of the situation now. Is this your first Chesapeake?

Tom
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Re: How concerned should I be?

Postby moscowitz » Mon Mar 06, 2017 2:48 am

Dog seems okay but you seem to be doing everything wrong . Dog parks are not a good place for dogs encourages aggressiveness. Play day is rediculous this is not a child it is a dog. Enroll in a good basic training program. Child should be taught not to hug the dog but pet him properly. The puppy could be seeing this Hugging as posturing as if a littermate is getting on top of him. Finally this puppy is an infant.
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Re: How concerned should I be?

Postby LilianRose » Mon Mar 06, 2017 3:07 am

Tom,

Yes, my first Chessie. I've also owned 2 German Shepherds.

Lilian
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Re: How concerned should I be?

Postby Pat Puwal » Mon Mar 06, 2017 3:17 am

We've had Chesapeakes for 40+ yrs. You need to be sure that in the puppy's mind you are a pack leader and so is your child. Are you taking the puppy to obedience classes yet? Basic obedience is a definite "must do" with young Chesapeake pups. They need to learn to sit on command, lie down, heel on a leash, come when called, etc. I don't take my dogs to dog parks and I only let the dogs I own play under my supervision. I am in charge of their balls, chew bones, etc. Everything comes from me and they can only have it when I allow them that privilege. You might want to read "Nothing In Life Is Free". http://k9deb.com/NILIF.html
When dogs know that they are dogs and have a definite place in the pecking order, they are happier and more secure.
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Re: How concerned should I be?

Postby thomas wilkins » Mon Mar 06, 2017 1:03 pm

Lilian,

I am glad that you are reaching out for advice. This being your first Chesapeake you are finding out that Chesapeakes
are very strong willed animals. You being the Leader of the pack a have to take control of your dog"s actions to reactions.
Paul mentioned to start basic obedience this way your chessie will respond to you under command. Have him sit and wait
before you put his feed bowl on the ground make sure he stays until you give him the command to eat. these little gestures
are teaching him that you are the leader not him. You have to be consistent with your commands.There also is another book
called Leader of the pack.How to take control of your relationship with your dog The authors are Nancy Baer and Steve Duno.

Tom
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Re: How concerned should I be?

Postby LilianRose » Mon Mar 06, 2017 2:40 pm

Moscowitz,
Maybe using the term "playdate" is misleading. At least once a week I have a supervised play session between my puppy and 1-3 other well known dogs. This is not a free for all. This was the first dog park we visited.
At around 4mo old, I talked to my kids about not hugging. I reminded them about a week before, and my 7yr old waited til I walked out of room to hug him. We don't allow hugging.

Pat Pawl,
I did do an early on class with him, and he knows his obedience very well. He can do all basic obedience very well, and he walks in the heel position on all walks.
I love the Nothing in Life is Free! I follow through on this with all interactions. I recognized 4 weeks ago my 7 yr old (which is the least assertive person in our house) needed to follow through on this better, and over the last 4 weeks we have spent a lot of time on the relationship between them. Now I carefully watch all interactions between them to make sure the puppy isn't getting away with inappropriate behavior. When playing fetch, he has to sit before the ball is thrown, before eating he has to sit and wait patiently, before going through doors or exiting the crate sit-stay.

As for the resource guarding I was caught by surprise. This specific puppy is another intact male, and they've played about dozen times. Usually my puppy is quick to submit to other dogs, but not with this individual. We have not met up with them since.

We're a super active family, and I spent A LOT of time on socialization. When he does appear protective in public a quick command (sit, look, down, etc) redirects him quickly and he's focused on me, no longer concerned with the stranger. All but the one exception a little more than a week ago.

Thanks for all your advice/thoughts so far...please keep them coming.
Last edited by LilianRose on Mon Mar 06, 2017 8:31 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: How concerned should I be?

Postby moscowitz » Mon Mar 06, 2017 7:58 pm

Good luck. 6 months still a puppy and let it be a puppy. Repetition
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Re: How concerned should I be?

Postby BrianK » Sun Mar 19, 2017 7:11 pm

To add to the previous comments of good sound advice...

We have multiple dogs in the house and 7 year old son along with multiple friends possibly at a time in our house.

My suggestion reinforces the notion you need to be the pack leader. Take this a step further, the seven year old also needs to be ahead of the dog in your pack. One of the best ways to do this is at feeding time at an early age. You will need to supervise this but I have all my dogs sit while my son puts the food out. I also give my son a signal and he releases the dogs for the food. If you already have food aggression I would not suggest this though. The same concept in training (with the 7 year old being the trainer or perceived trainer) can be done with treats and standard obedience (sit, stay, here, down...).
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Re: How concerned should I be?

Postby WMRk9 » Mon Oct 16, 2017 9:57 pm

I am new to the site so folks, take what I say with a grain or salt, or the whole damn shaker. anyhow, heres my take on things.
this is coming from a person who works with very confident, fight driven, high prey dogs. Finding myself as leader is a must.

I started my training in the old school yank and crank mentality. Compulsion this, compulsion that. If he shows any sign of aggression towards you , roll him, if he bites you, string em up!.

what we have learned over the years, understanding your and your families safety is paramount, is that, maintaining a lead roll in a pack is not based on a single fight (in the dogs eyes0, but in taking control in the dogs life all over.

1) I do not like dog parks. You may think you are socializing your dog, but do some research and learning on dog body language and communication and go sit by a dog park for a bit and just watch. dogs are pack animals, all dog parks to me are is a big arena of dogs working for places in pack structure and with dogs always changing, its its a never ending cycle.

2) you need to keep things structured, feeding times, break times, where he can and cant go, where he can and cant lie. Make him work for his food. Nothing is free and everything is worked for, and everything comes from the folks above him in the pack.

3) the biggest mistake I see people doing is lacking consistency and structure in obedience. As dopey as it sounds, sit means sit.
after commands are taught and proofed and the dog shows they understand the command, you cannot let them give you the middle finger. Do not give a command you cannot immediately reinforce and do so swiftly and solidly without much or any personal conflict, it does not need to be personal. all of these things can be done and show the dog you are the leader. as you establish yourself as leader, let the dog know who else is leader.
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